Officers of the Civil War

RonPaulCurriculum 8th Grade History Essay

Today for history I have to write about 2 officers of the Union and Confederate side. So it’s 4 officers in total. For the Union I decided on Ulysses S. Grant and Ambrose E. Burnside, and the Confederates, Thomas Jackson and James Longstreet.

Unionulysses_s-_grant_1870-1880

Ulysses S. Grant

I will first talk about the famous general, Ulysses S. Grant. Grant was born April 1822, in Ohio. He fought in the Mexican-American War, American Civil War, and after the Civil War, he became president. When he was younger, he was going to take over his father’s tanning business, but when he was 17, his father enrolled him in the United States Military Academy at West Point. He then graduated from West Point in 1843.

He then served in the Mexican-American War, as a quartermaster. He served under General Zachary Taylor and General Winfield Scott, and watched their military tactics and leadership skills. And when he led a group of men into battle, he was praised for his braveness in battle.

During the beginning of the Civil War, he was a general of the Westward campaigns. After his victory at the Siege of Vicksburg, he was promoted to commander of all Union Armies in 1863.

The Civil War ended with the Union victory, as you probably already know, and after the 17th President Andrew Johnson, Ulysses S. Grant was elected the 18th president of the United States of America. Only being 46 years old, he was the youngest president at that time.

After his presidency, he suffered from throat cancer, and he began writing about his life. He even asked Mark Twain to publish his memoirs. He died on July, 1885, in New York as his memoirs were being published. They sold about 300,000 copies, and made nearly $450,000.800px-ambrose_burnside2

Ambrose Everett Burnside

Next I’ll talk about Ambrose Everett Burnside. Burnside was born in 1824, and served in the Civil War. He was also a railroad executive, inventor, industrialist, and politician.

Grew up in Rhode Island, and had victories and defeats during the Civil War. He invented a gun called the Burnside Carbine, and served as a senator and governor of Rhode Island. After the Civil War, he was the first president of the National Rifle Association(NRA). And his unique facial hair style was named “Sideburns”.

Confederates

Now I’ll talk about 2 confederate officers, Thomas Jackson and James Longstreet.

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Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson

Thomas Jackson, born January, 1824, served in the Mexican-American War and Civil War. Jackson was a very popular confederate general, and is given the nickname “Stonewall Jackson”. In 1842 he attended U.S. Military Academy at West Point, New York, and in 1848, he graduated 17th in class of 59 students.

He served in the Mexican-American War as 2nd Lieutenant under General Winfield Scott and showed bravery in battles. After the Mexican-American War, he taught in the Virginia Military Institute in Lexington.

During the Civil War he served as General Lee’s right-hand man until Lee’s death. Military historians said Jackson to be a tactical genius.

But during the Battle of Chancellorsville(May 1863), he was accidently shot by friendly fire, and was taken to a nearby hospital, where his arm was amputated. Then was moved to another hospital in Guinea Station, Virginia, and died there on May 10, 1863, at the age of 39.

james_longstreet

James Longstreet

Finally, I’ll talk about James Longstreet. Longstreet, born in January, 1821, was an important general under Robert E. Lee. He also fought together with “Stonewall” Jackson. Jackson was an offensive guy and Longstreet a more of a defensive person.

Longstreet is known for the victories at the Second Bull Run/Manassas, Fredericksburg, and Chickamauga.

After the war, Longstreet worked as a diplomat and a civil servant of the U.S. government.

All these men are great generals and served in the American Civil War(1861-1865). Thanks for reading.

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